Royal Caribbean Ships by Size [Infographic] – Does Size Matter?

Cruise Ship Size Comparison – RCCL

We previously posted an infographic showing Carnival Cruise Ship Sizes and it our users loved it! On Ship Mate’s Pinterest page, it’s been pinned over 9,000 times! So we decided to give our RCCL fans a similar post showing a Royal Caribbean Ships by Size Comparison.

Also, if interested, we also have an infographic showing Royal Caribbean Ships by Age. For the past 30 years, RC has been building ships. Figure out how old your favorite ship is and where it fits on that list.

What type of cruiser are you?  Do you prefer the larger ships? Some of the newer ships like the Harmony, Ovation, Allure and Oasis of the Seas are essentially floating cities. Passengers and crew members combined total roughly 10k people on these ships! During a typical 7-day sailing, it’s likely you won’t see half the cruise ship. With a dozen or more restaurants, you’d have to eat lunch and dinner in a different venue every day to see them all.  If you’re the type that likes to continuously explore new venues, then you may want to look at the top of the Royal Caribbean Ship Size Chart below.

Or, are you the type that likes to get to know every nook and cranny of your cruise ship? Do you prefer familiarity and comfort knowing every bar and hallway of your vessel? Are you overwhelmed by the the city-sized ships? If so, you’ll want to look at the lower portion of the size comparison chart below.

Whatever your fancy, Royal Caribbean has the ship for you. The ships at the bottom of the size comparison chart are less than 1/3rd those at the top! That’s how drastically they vary!

Also included in the chart, we show Royal Caribbean Ships based on Passenger Capacity. You’ll notice the little stick-figure men for each ship. Those each represent 100 passengers. On Harmony of the Seas, for example, you’ll notice 64 of those little guys. That means the ship has a passenger capacity of 6,400. That’s not even counting the crew! Royal Caribbean’s smallest ship is less than 1/3rd the capacity.

Royal Caribbean Ships by Size

Royal Caribbean Ships by Size InfographIn case you’re curious, there are significant price differences between Royal Caribbean’s largest ship and the cruise line’s smallest.

We’ve included a pricing widget below to check upcoming sailing prices for RCCL’s biggest ship, the new Harmony of the Seas. And, below that, you’ll find a pricing widget for all Royal Caribbean ships.

If you like them BIG, then you may as well go top of the food chain. Harmony of the Seas. Use the widget below to check prices for this new ship.

Harmony of the Seas (RCCL’s Biggest Ship)

Biggest Cruise Ship vs Smallest

For those with size preferences on one end of the spectrum or the other, this should be interesting.  Below you’ll find a comparison of the smallest and largest cruise ships in Royal’s Fleet.

royal caribbean ships by size main

The Harmony of the Seas is a freaking behemoth, while the Serenade of the Seas is just a little guy (in comparison). The Harmony is actually the largest cruise ship in the world (by gross tonnage)… not just in Royal Caribbean’s fleet.

The Serenade of the Seas, however, is far from the globe’s smallest cruise ship. Of those covered by the Ship Mate Cruise App, the Costa Voyager is a mere 24k tons (roughly 1/3rd that of the Serenade).

Royal Caribbean Price Check – All Ships

You can use the Cruise Price Check Widget below to compare the new Harmony of the Seas to the rest of the Royal Caribbean Family.

Check out how the price compares as you go up and down the Royal Caribbean Ships by Size Comparison. You might be surprised!

 

Here’s more detail on each of Royal Caribbean Ships by Size:


Harmony of the Seas

Year Built:       2015
Cost:               $1.35 Billion
Passengers:   6,410
Crew:              2,300
Tonnage:        228k
Length:           362 meters
Speed:            23 knots


Allure of the Seas

Year Built:       2010
Cost:               $1.2 Billion
Passengers:   6,410
Crew:              2,384
Tonnage:        225k
Length:           362 meters
Speed:            23 knots


Oasis of the Seas

Year Built:       2009
Cost:               $1.4 Billion
Passengers:   6,360
Crew:              2,394
Tonnage:        225k
Length:           361 meters
Speed:            23 knots


Anthem of the Seas

Year Built:       2014
Cost:               $940 Million
Passengers:   4,905
Crew:              1,500
Tonnage:        169k
Length:           348 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Quantum of the Seas

Year Built:       2014
Cost:               $940 Million
Passengers:   4,905
Crew:              1,500
Tonnage:        169k
Length:           348 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Ovation of the Seas

Year Built:       2016
Cost:               $1.4 Billion
Passengers:   4,819
Crew:              1,300
Tonnage:        169k
Length:           348 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Freedom of the Seas

Year Built:       2006
Cost:               $800 Million
Passengers:   4,515
Crew:              1,360
Tonnage:        154k
Length:           339 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Independence of the Seas

Year Built:       2008
Cost:               $828 Million
Passengers:   4,375
Crew:              1,360
Tonnage:        154k
Length:           339 meters
Speed:            23 knots


Liberty of the Seas

Year Built:       2007
Cost:               $800 Million
Passengers:   4,375
Crew:              1,360
Tonnage:        154k
Length:           339 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Navigator of the Seas

Year Built:       2002
Passengers:   3,990
Crew:              1,213
Tonnage:        138k
Length:           311 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Mariner of the Seas

Year Built:       2003
Cost:               $650 Million
Passengers:   3,807
Crew:              1,185
Tonnage:        138k
Length:           311 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Explorer of the Seas

Year Built:       2000
Passengers:   3,840
Crew:              1,185
Tonnage:        137k
Length:           311 meters
Speed:            24 knots


Voyager of the Seas

Year Built:       1999
Cost:               $650 Million
Passengers:   3,840
Crew:              1,176
Tonnage:        137k
Length:           311 meters
Speed:            24 knots


Adventure of the Seas

Year Built:       2001
Cost:               $500 Million
Passengers:   3,114
Crew:              1,180
Tonnage:        137k
Length:           311 meters
Speed:            23 knots


Radiance of the Seas

Year Built:       2001
Passengers:   2,466
Crew:              894
Tonnage:        90k
Length:           293 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Brilliance of the Seas

Year Built:       2002
Cost:               $350 Million
Passengers:   2,543
Crew:              848
Tonnage:        90k
Length:           293 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Jewel of the Seas

Year Built:       2004
Passengers:   2,502
Crew:              859
Tonnage:        90k
Length:           293 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Serenade of the Seas

Year Built:       2003
Passengers:   2,476
Crew:              884
Tonnage:        91k
Length:           294 meters
Speed:            25 knots


Enchantment of the Seas

Year Built:       1997
Cost:               $300 Million
Passengers:   2,730
Crew:              852
Tonnage:        83k
Length:           279 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Rhapsody of the Seas

Year Built:       1997
Passengers:   2,416
Crew:              765
Tonnage:        78k
Length:           279 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Vision of the Seas

Year Built:       1998
Passengers:   2,514
Crew:              742
Tonnage:        78k
Length:           279 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Majesty of the Seas

Year Built:       1992
Passengers:   2,767
Crew:              912
Tonnage:        74k
Length:           268 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Monarch of the Seas

Year Built:       1991
Passengers:   2,744
Crew:              827
Tonnage:        74k
Length:           268 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Grandeur of the Seas

Year Built:       1996
Passengers:   2,440
Crew:              760
Tonnage:        74k
Length:           279 meters
Speed:            22 knots


Legend of the Seas

Year Built:       1995
Passengers:   2,074
Crew:              726
Tonnage:        69k
Length:           264 meters
Speed:            27 knots


Splendour of the Seas

Year Built:       1996
Passengers:   2,074
Crew:              761
Tonnage:        69k
Length:           264 meters
Speed:            24 knots


So tell us, does SIZE matter?  Do you prefer big or small?  Let us know in the comments below!

And please “Share” this with any of your fellow Royal Caribbean fans!

18 thoughts on “Royal Caribbean Ships by Size [Infographic] – Does Size Matter?

    • That’s incorrect, cruiseaholictim. The Majesty is shown as 74k gross tonnage and Vision as 78k. I’m not sure where you’re seeing that as larger. We have thousands of users that have fondly sailed the Monarch.

  1. Would have been better if you used photos of the actual ship rather than a squished down image of an Oasis class ship for all of them. Some of the smaller classes aren’t nearly as tall, and they have a totally different appearance!

  2. Sounds to me cruiseaholictim like you have a big ago. Who cares that you have sailed on ALL of them. This was just a comparison between the ship sizes and tonnage etc. The classes were not even mentioned nor does it say they are current Royal Carribean Ship. Infact if you go back and read one of the first lines it said ‘So we decided to give our RCCL fans a similar post showing a Royal Caribbean Ships by Size Comparison.’ So perhaps there were fans that sailed upon Monarch and for them adding that ship in was fitting. And god forbid that he missed a ship. Im sure just pointing it out instead of being an arse about it would have been more appropriate. Get off you high horse.

    Nice comparison chart Shipmatemike. I for one thought it was interesting.

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